OSHA Safety Topic: Nightmare in Ohio Foundry – Noise Exposure Plus Silica Dust

Construction worker using a concrete saw cutting stones in a cloud of concrete dust for creating a track.

Falls, confined spaces, and electrical hazards aren’t the only dangers affecting workers. Noise exposure is an often overlooked safety topic, especially in industrial workplaces where noise is constant. Each year in the United States, thousands of workers suffer permanent, avoidable hearing loss, with 21,000 cases in 2009 alone. Another often missed danger is crystalline silica dust, which can cause the sometimes fatal lung disease, silicosis. Businesses should ensure that all workers be protected and receive comprehensive training in OSHA safety topics to help prevent exposure to these and other workplace hazards.

Double Safety Hazard at MCM Precision Castings

During an eight-hour shift, an Ohio worker at MCM Precision Castings Inc. was bombarded by sustained noise levels of nearly 100… Continue reading

Do you need OSHA10 or OSHA30 General Safety Course? [Infographic]

OSHA safety training is an important part of any workplace environment. All workers can benefit from being aware of basic safety issues on the job. But many workers encounter a number of different hazards on the job, and may supervise or collaborate with others who work with still more and different potential safety or health hazards. So what kind of OSHA training is right for these situations?  How much do you really need?

In general the first determination is your actual job responsibilities. If you work in a non-supervisor role, then typically the OSHA 10 Hour Course is best for you. If, however, you have line management, resource management, safety director responsibilities or executive level supervision, the OSHA 30… Continue reading

Avoid the OSHA Focus Four Hazards [infographic]

Recognizing and knowing how to avoid the OSHA Focus Four Hazards may be the most important thing you learn in your OSHA training courses. These “Fatal Four” are the four most common causes of fatalities in the workplace.To help highlight the importance of recognizing these dangers and having clear workplace safety procedures to avoid them, we’ve put this information into an easy-to-use Infographic. If you find it useful, be sure to share it with your team and coworkers.

OSHA Focus Four Hazards Causes and Prevention Infographic

Electrical Hazard Safety Training Tips Infographic

Electrical safety hazards are one of the most common sources of injury on the job. Osha identifies the five primary electrical hazards as power lines, improper use of extension and flexible cords, path to ground missing or discontinuous, lack of ground fault protection, and equipment not used in manner prescribed. Proper safety training can help workers avoid these dangers. Use and share our easy-to-follow instructional infographic for reminders on how to protect yourself and your workforce from these hazards.

OSHA Electrical Hazards Causes and Safety Tips  infographic

Do You Need OSHA 10, or OSHA 30 for Your Construction Job?

(Note: Due to a typographical error in production, this chart had some errors that were corrected on 2/13/2015 – Please make sure you have the latest version)

Whether it’s the OSHA 10 Hour Construction course or the OSHA 30 hour course, OSHA training for the construction industry is a core component of compliance and on-the-job safety. If you work in the construction industry, do you know what kind of OSHA construction safety training you need?  We’ve prepared this infographic to help you understand the differences between the OSHA construction industry training 10 hour course and the 30 hour course so you can decide for yourself.

Infographic showing the difference between OSHA 10 and OSHA 30 Construction Classes

 

 

 

Recording OSHA Incidents – When do You Have to Report?

Construction accident

What do you do after an employee is injured on the job, receives medical attention and reports back to you? A worker’s comp claim and the threat of an OSHA inspection are enough to send a shiver down any manager’s spine. Employees become distracted, productivity slows to a crawl, and general workplace safety becomes even more of an issue.

While OSHA may seem like the bane of many companies’ existence, the risks of avoiding them can be just as bad as a visit from their inspectors. If a workplace injury is recordable by OSHA Standards, it’s often better to take your medicine and report an injury or illness, rather than face the hefty fines and punitive action that can result… Continue reading

Five Common Ergonomics Mistakes

Ergonomics (also known as human factors engineering) is defined as the study of people’s efficiency in their working environment. OSHA, and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC/NIOSH)  both have dedicated pages of information regarding the role of ergonomics in the workplace. It also has a role in prevention of workplace injuries and disabilities. The American Psychological Association (APA) also published a widely distributed article regarding ergonomics and it’s role in long-term mental health and fitness.

For those not familiar with the study of ergonomics, any serious manager, foreman or supervisor needs to become at least somewhat aware of it’s tenets in order to provide a comfortable workplace. Ergonomics is a globally-recognized science with a body of validated research… Continue reading

OSHA 30 Online course an inexpensive way to build needed safety awareness

A Mentor Ohio company is paying the price big time for failing to follow and adequately train its employees on OSHA health and safety regulations. Metal Seal Precision, LTD is facing $56,700 in OSHA penalties due to multiple health and safety violations. And, after a plant fire that followed the OSHA penalties, the price is now a whole lot steeper.

construction co-workers discussing about work plan constructionWorkplace safety is no laughing matter and there can be serious consequences for businesses who do not make safety, including regular OSHA safety training, a top priority. The Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) requires all employers to ensure worker safety through a combination of written safety policies and adequate OSHA-standard worker safety training, such as an OSHA 30 online… Continue reading

Infographic: Crisis Management Plan

We all know that we need to plan for the unexpected, but so often companies don’t do it.  I think part of the reason for this is that managers don’t even know where to start.  I recently read a blog post by Brenda Percy  that laid out the basic pieces of a simple but effective crisis management plan.  Although Brenda’s article is very clear, with her permission we prepared an infographic to complement it for 2 reasons.  First, some people are simply visual learners and infographics are great for conveying the principles quickly and cleanly.  Second, if you’ve read Brenda’s article already, this infographic is a way to help you remember the key… Continue reading

Answers to OSHA Pro’s Welding Safety Quiz

Welding-WelderTest Your Welding Safety Knowledge – Answers

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What is the most common injury to a welder?

Burns and eye injuries are the most common injuries to welders due to sparks landing on the skin or in the eyes. Infrared and ultraviolet radiation are also sources of eye injuries and burns. Infrared radiation can cause retinal burning and cataracts. IR is usually felt as heat. Ultraviolet radiation cannot be felt as heat, but can cause an eye burn known as “Welder’s Flash.” Welding arcs are very intense and can cause burns to skin and eyes with just a few minutes of exposure. Even brief exposure to… Continue reading